New warnings issued on impact of food additives on children

The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a very strong warning on food additives which seriously harm the health of children.

The AAP did an extensive review of the health-damaging implications of some “very common” chemicals added to foods to extend the shelf life of such foods.

Each of those chemicals is proven to cause damage to the health of humans, including adults.

However given that children’s bodies are still growing, the negative impact of such chemicals can be much more severe.

Who are the guilty suspects and what are they guilty of?

BPA – used in plastic bottles and metal cans (such as soft drinks): BPA “can act like estrogen in the body, affecting onset of puberty, decreasing fertility, increasing body fat and affecting the nervous and immune systems”.

Phthalates – commonly found in foods packaged in plastic: “these chemicals can affect male genital development, increase childhood obesity and contribute to heart disease.”

PFCs – commonly used in grease-proof paper food packaging: “they might reduce immunity, birth weight and fertility, and can affect the thyroid system.”

Percholate – commonly added to dry food packaging to control static electricity: “known to disrupt thyroid function and can affect early brain development.”

Artificial food colors – commonly added to candy: “associated with worsened attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms.”

Nitrates and nitrites – commonly used to preserve food and enhance color, usually in cured and processed meats: “can interfere with thyroid hormone production, and have been linked with gastrointestinal and nervous system cancers.”.

As I often say: if you care about the state of your child’s immune system, development, nervous system, and overall health, then make sure the bulk of their diet consists of fresh fruits and vegetables (in season), high quality (free range) meats & dairy products, and clean water.

For more on the AAP’s warnings: https://wb.md/2y5SKKL

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